92y:

#TuesdayTip: Introducing Salt to Watercolor Washes
By Katie Shulman, Manager After-School and Evening Programs, DIY Printmaking Instructor I draw visual inspiration from interesting textures. When I’m in need of a source of visual inspiration to create a new collage or print, I look towards simple processes that liven up my canvas. Adding salt crystals to a watercolor wash is a great way to create a textured base for a new piece. The process also introduces an element of unpredictability, which I find exciting.
I first start by choosing an absorbent paper to work with. I generally work with Arches watercolor blocks, either 140lb or 300lb.
Next, I choose a color pallet to work with. In the past I’ve created layered washes with different shades of a particular color (light, medium, dark green) plus white and black.
I like to start working with the lightest washes, applying the watercolor with brushes of varying sizes.
Once the first wash layer is down, I sprinkle different kinds of salt crystals on the damp paper.
Let the first wash dry completely and brush off the salt crystals.
Apply a second, darker watercolor wash and then sprinkle more salt on top.
Repeat this process until you have a textured background that will inspire a unique piece of work.
Each crystal of salt dehydrates the pigment it comes into contact with, creating a lightened shape once the watercolor dries and the salt is brushed away. The amount of salt, type of salt crystal and dampness of your working surface affects the texture the crystals leave behind. Be sure to experiment with different kinds of salt (table, kosher, sea)—the possibilities are endless!

92y:

#TuesdayTip: Introducing Salt to Watercolor Washes

By Katie Shulman, Manager After-School and Evening Programs, DIY Printmaking Instructor

I draw visual inspiration from interesting textures. When I’m in need of a source of visual inspiration to create a new collage or print, I look towards simple processes that liven up my canvas. Adding salt crystals to a watercolor wash is a great way to create a textured base for a new piece. The process also introduces an element of unpredictability, which I find exciting.

  • I first start by choosing an absorbent paper to work with. I generally work with Arches watercolor blocks, either 140lb or 300lb.
  • Next, I choose a color pallet to work with. In the past I’ve created layered washes with different shades of a particular color (light, medium, dark green) plus white and black.
  • I like to start working with the lightest washes, applying the watercolor with brushes of varying sizes.
  • Once the first wash layer is down, I sprinkle different kinds of salt crystals on the damp paper.
  • Let the first wash dry completely and brush off the salt crystals.
  • Apply a second, darker watercolor wash and then sprinkle more salt on top.
  • Repeat this process until you have a textured background that will inspire a unique piece of work.

Each crystal of salt dehydrates the pigment it comes into contact with, creating a lightened shape once the watercolor dries and the salt is brushed away. The amount of salt, type of salt crystal and dampness of your working surface affects the texture the crystals leave behind. Be sure to experiment with different kinds of salt (table, kosher, sea)—the possibilities are endless!

Touring the Old City Hall Subway Station

Touring the Old City Hall Subway Station

untappedcities:

Just A Few Tickets Left to Our Walking Tour of the World’s Tallest Buildings in NYC! http://ift.tt/1fYix4i

untappedcities:

Just A Few Tickets Left to Our Walking Tour of the World’s Tallest Buildings in NYC! http://ift.tt/1fYix4i

In Bill Cunningham’s Early Work, on View at the NY-Historical Society, Fashion & Architecture Collide

In Bill Cunningham’s Early Work, on View at the NY-Historical Society, Fashion & Architecture Collide

tedx:

Learn more in this TEDx Talk from Hamish Jolly, who worked with scientists in Australia to develop research-based wetsuits»

When the number of shark attacks in western Australia rose dramatically, Hamish turned to nature for inspiration to create shark-repelling wetsuits.

How?

  1. A very stripey wetsuit that mimics the natural shark attack repellent of the pilot fish, whose distinct black and white markings signal do-not-eat to a shark.

  2. By using research on the limits of sharks’ visual abilities to create a wetsuit whose carefully-chosen colors allow humans to blend in seamlessly with ocean water.

Watch the whole talk here»

(Pilot fish photo via Flickr user star5112)

untappedcities:

The Uncertain Fate of a Picasso Tapestry at the Four Seasons Restaurant in NYC http://ift.tt/1gi8s5z

untappedcities:

The Uncertain Fate of a Picasso Tapestry at the Four Seasons Restaurant in NYC http://ift.tt/1gi8s5z

Apple had to make real the dreams people didn’t know were dreamable.
untappedcities:

We’re taking the official #untappedcities tour of the Woolworth Building right now! Stay tuned for more Untapped events! http://ift.tt/1muje9f

untappedcities:

We’re taking the official #untappedcities tour of the Woolworth Building right now! Stay tuned for more Untapped events! http://ift.tt/1muje9f

newyorker:

Casey N. Cep on maps in literature: http://nyr.kr/LHLd9Z

“No map can be a perfect representation of reality; every map is an interpretation, which may be why writers are so drawn to them.”

Illustration by Roland Chambers, from Lev Grossman’s “The Magician King.”

newyorker:

Casey N. Cep on maps in literature: http://nyr.kr/LHLd9Z

“No map can be a perfect representation of reality; every map is an interpretation, which may be why writers are so drawn to them.”

Illustration by Roland Chambers, from Lev Grossman’s “The Magician King.”

nprmusic:

These are the 52 musicians and bands Bruce Springsteen enthusiastically mentions in exhaustive, 72-minute interview on NPR Music. Time to do some research, y’all. 

  • Pearl Jam
  • Rage Against the Machine
  • Bob Dylan
  • Frank Sinatra
  • Hank Williams
  • The Beatles
  • The Rolling Stones
  • U2
  • The Everly Brothers
  • Sam & Dave
  • Simon & Garfunkel
  • Creedence Clearwater Revival
  • The Who
  • Oasis
  • The Kinks
  • James Brown
  • Jay Z
  • Public Enemy
  • The Notorious B.I.G.
  • Tupac Shakur
  • Kanye West
  • Toby Keith
  • Kenny Chesney
  • George Jones
  • Conway Twitty
  • Lefty Frizzell
  • David Blue
  • Jackson Browne
  • Dave Van Ronk
  • The New York Dolls
  • Suicide
  • Elvis Presley
  • Savages
  • T-Bone Burnett
  • The Gaslight Anthem
  • Against Me!
  • Jason Isbell
  • Drive-By Truckers
  • Slim Dunlap
  • The Replacements
  • Kristina Train
  • Dusty Springfield
  • Eric Church
  • Yo La Tengo
  • Phosphorescent
  • Bonnie “Prince” Billy
  • 8th Day
  • Gene Chandler
  • Frank Wilson
  • Phil Spector
  • The Fleshtones
  • The Grateful Dead
Where do you find inspiration?

Where do you find inspiration?

Sea, clouds, sky.

Sea, clouds, sky.